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Posts Tagged ‘language’

My due date buddy sent me this quiz.  Mostly I think of this pass along e-mail junk unfavorably, but I have a soft spot in my heart for linguistics.

After all, I spent all those years in broadcasting school getting rid of my Youngstowner accent.

And my best friend is a language lab director.

And my husband and I have several “no, that word doesn’t mean THAT” games.

Imagine my shock that I was 60% Dixie.  “Barely in the Dixie category” the quiz tells me.  I’m surprised that I registered anywhere but neural.  I guess, living here in the South for so long, I got some on me.

How did you score?  and did you find the quiz particularly scientific?

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Eleanor is having a high time over there right now with her new whistle.  We practiced Easter Egg hunting today at playgroup.  Elly did very well.  She got 8 or so of the little eggs that were hidden covertly in plain sight.  One had a whistle.

I’m regretting now teaching her how to blow the thing.  But only a little. She is so excited about it.  She got the little pink bunny whistle to toot and exclaimed, “I got a blow in da Mouff!  I gotta maka blow in da MOUFF!!!”

It’s a typical way that Eleanor expresses new things in her world.  In this way, she expresses gum as “candy in da mouff” and a scab is “a boo boo wiff paper on it.”  She takes what few words she knows and uses them to express herself almost completely.

I love to get her talking, but she does more for her daddy than she does for me. I guess it’s because I am with her all the time, and I see just about all of what she does.  She doesn’t feel the need to expand because she knows I know already.  When Daddy says, “What did you do today,” she goes on for ages.  It’s interesting what she remembers from her day to tell Daddy and what she doesn’t.  Sometimes, I think it is as simple as a lack of words.  Invariably, she NEVER tells her daddy about the times when she gets in trouble.  Often, I have to translate toddler into English.

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Heather Here, digging through some thick vocabulary issues, has been straightening out those who seem to speak from the bottom of the literary barrel. I wanted to chime in, not so much with a correction, but a language oddity.

Fat chance.

It’s one of my favorite expressions. My husband pointed out to me the other day that slim chance and fat chance mean ALMOST the same thing:

There is only a slim chance that I will walk 5 miles today.

Will I walk 5 miles today? Fat chance!

Strangely, slim chance is more possible than fat chance. Slim chances almost always turn into fat chances. But there is a slim chance for some fat chance to become a real thing.

Agree?

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